AdSense Micro-Niche Site Public Case Study – Content & Ad Placement (Part 4)

Now, we’re finally getting to the meat of the project!  Aside from traffic (which we’ll get to in the next part of the case study), content and ads are going to be the key ingredients to making money with an AdSense micro-niche site.

In this section of the case study, I’m going to walk through how I create my niche site content, including where my ideas come from and how I outsource the creation.  Once the content is added to the site, I work on ad placement, a critical task in optimizing the earning potential of a niche site.

Let’s get into it!

A Brief Word on The Importance of (Good) Content

No article about content creation would be complete without mentioning the obvious, yet often overlooked, fact that good content is very important to a site’s success.  With micro-niche sites, things get a bit hairier.  The same principles apply, but your objectives are slightly different.  On an authority website, you absolutely need great content and it needs to be executed well – otherwise, no one is going to return to your site or bookmark/share your writing.

With micro-niche sites, we’re less concerned with that.  While it would be great to have content shared and bookmarked, we’re not relying on it.  That doesn’t mean we ignore the goal of “good content,” but it does mean that we aren’t interested in making it to the front page of Digg.  For micro-niche websites, theses are the most important content-related “rules”:

1) Content must be unique – This doesn’t require much explaining. If your content isn’t unique, you’re not adding value to the internet.  Value aside, you’re most likely plagiarizing someone else’s work, which is illegal (aside from PLR content, which I won’t be going into).

2) Content should give the reader the information he or she desires, or at least point them in the right direction – You can never expect to be comprehensive with your content, but it’s important that you’re adding value.  The reaction you don’t want is, “What is this crap? This has nothing to do with what I’m looking for.”

3) Content should be written with the reader in mind, but structured with Google in mind – Never forget that you’re writing for people.  Good grammar, spelling, and sentence structure are extremely important and should never be overlooked.  That aside, you need to be sure you’re doing all of your “on page” things correctly, so that you maximize your chances of ranking highly on Google and other search engines.  This will be covered in more detail in the SEO section of the case study.

How to Get Started with Your Site’s Content

Before we can actually create the content, we have to figure out what the heck we’re going to write about and how much we’re going to write (initially). For my site, I’ve decided to begin with 3 articles, but ultimately I plan on adding more as time goes on.  My primary article will be 750+ words, and my two supporting articles will each be 400+ words.

There’s no real reasoning behind this – I think 400+ words is a good minimum point for article length, but I’m sure many people will tell you that you need more, or that there’s an amount less than 400 that is sufficient.  Here’s the truth: No one knows with absolute certainty, but more is generally better, provided the quality is there.

What to Write About

This is an area where some people struggle.  Should all articles be closely related to your primary keyword?  Should they be drastically different? I don’t think there’s a right or wrong answer, provided it’s logical.  If you’re targeting the keyword “coffee mugs” you probably shouldn’t write an article about polar bears (unless it’s a polar bear coffee mug – then by all means go for it).

The primary article is easy – write about your target keyword.  For my site, the primary article will be titled “Moving in Together” and it will discuss the implications (challenges, pros, cons, etc.) of a couple deciding to move in together.

The supporting content can be a bit more challenging.  To help me with this, I usually like to use Google’s Keyword Tool.  I start by typing in my primary keyword and looking at the results.  Usually, I’ll find a couple things that give me ideas for the supporting articles.  This is also a nice way to approach it because it allows you to see the keyword search volume of the keywords that your supporting articles may target.  I don’t put much thought into search volume for these, however.  My main goal is to focus on ranking for my primary keyword – anything else is icing on the cake.  As you develop a site and bring it beyond the point of being a micro-niche site, you can focus more on secondary keywords.

Based on the results I found, I’ve decided to have my supporting articles be closely related to my primary article.  Here’s what I’m going with:

I could have easily had my supporting articles be about “how to compromise in a relationship” or something similar, but I decided not to.  Again, it isn’t going to make a huge difference provided it makes sense.

Getting the Content Written

While you may choose to write the content yourself (which isn’t a bad idea if you have time and this is the first site you’ve created), I think this is the step where outsourcing saves you the most time.  Writing the 3 articles I’m planning for my site could easily take 3+ hours.   My time is much better spent researching new keywords and planning new sites, or optimizing current sites so that they perform better.  Therefore, it makes sense to pay someone to write the content for you.

A word of warning: In general, you get what you pay for.  Very inexpensive writing should always be examined closely to ensure that it’s properly written (grammar, structure, etc.) and to make sure it wasn’t copied from somewhere else.

Where to Outsource

With the several sites I’ve created in the past, I’ve experimented with a number of different outsourced writing.  Here’s what I’ve used before, and my brief review of it:

TextBroker - This is what I currently use.  The reason I like it is because they have their own internal system that helps to ensure the quality of the writing you receive.  You may pay a bit more here, but it’s worth it.  You pay per word, and the cost per word is dependent upon the quality of writing you choose (from 2 stars to 5 stars, 5 being “professional”).

The cool thing is, a 3-star order can be written by 4 or 5 star authors, but you still only pay the 3-star price.  In general, 3 stars is the quality I select – sometimes I need to make edits once I receive the completed article (somewhat due to the fact that I am picky), but overall it’s good.  The other nice benefit is that if you have a large order of articles, you can still get quick turnaround times because they are all being written by different authors. Finally, Textbroker automatically checks the article with Copyscape to make sure it’s unique (at least, per the criteria Copyscape uses).

ElanceI like Elance, but I like it more for larger orders/projects.  The advantages with Elance is that you can usually get work done less expensively, and if all of your articles for one site are written by the same person, it may appear more consistent (as far as writing style goes) across your entire site.  The downside is that you don’t necessarily know how good the writing will be, especially if you go with a less expensive author.

oDesk – Pretty much the same thing as Elance.  Also a great option.

FiverrIn my opinion, this one comes with a bigger “buyer beware” sticker.  I’ve used Fiverr for content before and had very mixed results.  Because you generally can’t read as much feedback about a provider and there is less incentive for a provider to do good work (vs. Elance and oDesk where many writers earn their living there and live/die by their feedback), the quality is often questionable.  I’d prefer to use content acquired via Fiverr for article marketing (backlinks) than for content that actually gets published on my niche sites.

A Look at My Outsourced Writing Order

In the interest of being fully transparent, here is an example of one of my writing orders that I placed with Textbroker (click image to enlarge):

Putting the Content On the Site

Once I receive the written articles from the writers at Textbroker, I review it for grammar, spelling, structure, and overall logic.  This typically doesn’t take long, unless it’s terribly written, in which case, I can send it back for revision.  For this site, I’m not crazy about the direction my writers took for these articles, but as long as it’s logical, I’ll go with it.  Obviously, a topic like “moving in together” invites some opinionated content.  In this case, my writers seemed to focus on stereotypes along with a level of cynicism.

For these types of sites, I like to publish the content as pages (instead of posts), and then I set the “main” article as a static page on the front page with the following selection:

Other Pages

Outside of adding the actual content that I’ve outsourced, I usually also add the following pages, both with the help of plugins:

  • Contact Us
  • Privacy Policy
I don’t remember where I read this, but I believe it to be true – in evaluating the quality of a site, Google looks for these pages.  Even if it’s not true, I still don’t think it could hurt.  The two plugins I used to generate these pages are Contact Form 7 and Google Privacy Policy.  There are several other plugins out there that basically do the same thing, so you can take your pick.

Ad Placement

This step is particularly important because ad placement will directly impact your earnings by influencing an ad’s click-through rate (“CTR”).  Although there are many tips out there for how and where you should place ads, the only way to truly determine what works for your site and your niche is by testing different ad placements.  Unfortunately, this exercise won’t do you much good until you have enough traffic to obtain good sample sizes for different ad placements.

For now, I’m going to go with an ad placement that I think is effective, but I’m fully prepared to change it later based on testing.   The screenshot below shows where I’ve placed my ads.

The ads within the content are generated by a plugin that I like called Awesome Ads – Google Adsense and Others.  (There are other similar plugins. ) The other ads were inserted manually, within the code of the theme and with a sidebar widget.  The only reason why I won’t go into that now is because every theme is different – showing you where I pasted the AdSense ad code in my theme is just as likely to confuse you if you aren’t experienced with playing in the code within WordPress.  Also, I probably don’t know it well enough to properly teach it.

A couple important notes about ad placement:

  • Although it does seem like there are a lot of ads, this is the right idea for these types of sites in my opinion.  We’re still well within Google’s rules (in fact, they won’t let you place more ads than their pre-determined maximum).
  • Pay attention to the color scheme of your ads.  As you’ll notice, I’ve selected colors that blend well with my theme.
It may be several months before I can properly test the placement of these ads, but for now, it’ll be fine.

Conclusion

Finally! The site is fully operational, with all ads in place.  I wish I could say it was time to go to bed and start earning money while I sleep, but as we all know, creating the site and adding content is only half the battle.  In the next section of the case study, I’ll focus on SEO and building backlinks – this step is going to be crucial to the success of this site.  Before I begin building backlinks, however, I will probably wait a week or two.  Building backlinks is something you don’t want to rush into and do quickly – slow and steady wins the race when it comes to proper SEO (and I’m sure there are exceptions to this).

What do you think about this so far? Do you have any tips to add, or questions I can answer? Share them in the comments!

Also, if you enjoyed this post, I’d greatly appreciate a share on Facebook or a retweet!  To make sure you don’t miss any future updates, subscribe to my RSS feed. Thanks!

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56 Responses to “AdSense Micro-Niche Site Public Case Study – Content & Ad Placement (Part 4)”

  1. You are doing a great job with this. I haven’t found a better explanation of how micro-niche sites are put together. Keep up the awesomeness. BTW, what is the possibility of getting a list of what all the rest of the articles will be? Perhaps just a teaser list?

    [Reply]

    Eric G. Reply:

    Thanks Jeff, I really appreciate that.

    As for the rest of the articles within this case study, there will probably be a couple more, and one will definitely cover SEO/backlinking.

    [Reply]

  2. From the screenshot, I believe you’re in violation of Google’s Adsense TOS. You can only have 3 ad blocks on a single page, last I checked; your page has 4 above the fold.

    [Reply]

    Lyndsy Simon Reply:

    I stand corrected. I could have sworn “ad unit” included link blocks, but it looks like they are separate now: http://www.google.com/adsense/support/bin/answer.py?hl=en&answer=9735

    [Reply]

    Eric G. Reply:

    Either way, I appreciate you looking out. :) I think if you go beyond the 3 ad block limit, the ads will actually go blank – so Google will actually make sure that you don’t break the rules.

    I don’t know if this still happens, but it happened to me a couple years ago when I knew nothing about it.

    [Reply]

  3. I find your tips very valuable and the Post very interesting.

    However, for Building Backlinks, i don’t wait a Week. You can build Backlinks a Day after. Only slowly and with Qalität.
    If I write an article, the next day I put some good baking links.

    These method functions very well and my post is equally wide in front in the ranking.

    I wish you all the Best with your Project in Future.
    With Greetings from Good Old Germany

    [Reply]

    Eric G. Reply:

    Thanks for the tips, Sandy. I think you’re right, that if you build the links slowly, you can start right away. I’m sure I could do that and I would be fine, however I’ve decided to wait 1-2 weeks after building the site to actually begin creating backlinks. Just a personal preference. :)

    [Reply]

  4. Great post Eric,

    In my opinion I will never write pages that are less than 750 words. My homepage is normally around 1000 but then once I am ranked in the 1st page of Google I normally write articles that are around 400 words just so that the site is being updated.

    [Reply]

    Eric G. Reply:

    Thanks Adam! I think that’s a solid criteria to stick to, and one that will allow Google to view your site as high quality (provided the content is unique and somewhat well written).

    [Reply]

  5. Ralph | Social Media Explained Reply November 23, 2011 at 6:43 pm

    Hey Eric,

    Great breakdown :)

    If you don’t mind i’d like to add
    http://www.iwriter.com to the list of writers. It is very fast in their turn around a lot easier to navigate than odesk and such.

    Speaking from experience, make sure your text solves a problem or click here features. So you can link an additional product or something. If people just read (and are satisfied) and go away .. you make no money :)

    Not sure if you are going to mention this later down the track but also setup your Adsense with channels. This makes it easier to track your websites. You better of doing this properly from the start than changing everything half way down the track (like I did…).

    Curious to see the results :)

    [Reply]

    Eric G. Reply:

    Thanks Ralph, you have some good points there. iWriter looks very interesting – I’ll have to check it out sometime.

    With AdSense niche sites, my goal is mainly to offer an answer or some kind of guidance for the reader’s search. I specifically don’t include a “call to action” because my objective is to have people leave the site via an AdSense ad, which will usually contain related information.

    As you can see in the screenshot above, the article is about “moving in together” however one ad is titled “Why Men Grow Distant.” Hopefully, someone would read my site, gain some useful (or at least interesting) information, and then be intrigued by a related topic within an ad.

    As for channels, I use URL channels for each of my niche sites (I forgot to mention that in the post). You can read more about setting those up here: http://www.google.com/adsense/support/bin/answer.py?answer=126138

    [Reply]

  6. More relating to content that visitors like to read more or are still interested (and click out = money in the bank )

    [Reply]

    Eric G. Reply:

    Exactly!

    [Reply]

  7. I have find odesk very useful to get my contents written. There are a lot of freelancers available there who are expert in writing unique content. I would like o recommend odesk to all who wants to outsource their contents.

    [Reply]

    Eric G. Reply:

    Agreed, oDesk is a great place to outsource writing. Thanks for the comment, Rasel.

    [Reply]

  8. Hey Eric, I’m sure you’ve heard of these guys but I started using The Content Authority for my articles. They are very similar to Text Broker and returned great articles within a day.

    I’m looking forward to your results with your site as I’m also gearing up to mass produce Adsense sites next year as part of my IM efforts.

    [Reply]

    Eric G. Reply:

    Good stuff, Harlan – I haven’t tried The Content Authority yet but I’ll have to do it sometime.

    Best of luck on your AdSense sites!

    [Reply]

  9. I agree with Harlan, I just started using Content Authority and they have a very fast turnaround, normally the next day. Their articles are great and I have never had a problem.

    [Reply]

    Eric G. Reply:

    That’s good to know, thanks Thomas. I’ll definitely check them out.

    [Reply]

  10. Hello,
    Eric I am Mohsin from Pakistan and I want to purchase bluehost.com hosting plus domain via your ref feral link. The problem is that I don’t have paypal account bcoz there is no paypal service in pakistan. I have money in my money booker account and I can pay from there. Do u have any solution of it. other than that I am following you step by step. this is a great piece of content that you provide in this post. waiting for your reply.

    [Reply]

  11. Mohsin,

    I’d look on Google on how to do this, a quick search will give you these options:

    http://propakistani.pk/2011/09/05/get-verified-paypal-account-in-pakistan/

    http://www.paktribune.com/pforums/posts.php?t=4085&start=1

    Good luck!

    [Reply]

    mohsin Reply:

    Bundle of thanks for the information. You really solved my problem. thanks again

    [Reply]

    Eric G. Reply:

    Thanks Mohsin!

    [Reply]

  12. I’m following your system here to see how it goes. Everything seems very solid. I’ve actually automated the entire process, makes it much easier! Let me know if you are interested in seeing what I have so far. :)

    Oddly, I have put together the WordPress site, put the content on, but now the AdSense isn’t actually showing up. If I highlight everything on the page, you can see that the ads are being put on the page but they aren’t visible. Have you ever run into this before?

    [Reply]

    Eric G. Reply:

    Hi Jeff – That’s awesome that you’ve found a way to automate the entire process. I’d definitely be interested in hearing more about that.

    I find that when AdSense ads don’t appear, it’s usually for one of three reasons:

    1) The ads were recently added – sometimes it takes 10-15 minutes for new ads to begin appearing.

    2) You have too many ad blocks (more than 3 ads or link units), which I believe causes Google to disable all of them (or at least, it used to). I’ve gotten so used to the rules that I haven’t tried placing more than 3 ads on one page in a long time.

    3) There are no ads to display. If you’re in a niche that target keywords that have no advertisers, it’s possible that an ad is blank because it has nothing to display. I’ve seen this happen with link units, however not with normal ad blocks.

    There could be other reasons why they are not displaying (check to make sure you have your publisher # properly included in the code for the ads), but these are the ones I have experienced…hope that helps!

    [Reply]

    Jeff Richley Reply:

    I figured it out. Interestingly, if you do not put your pin in to verify your address, eventually your ads will stop showing. I hadn’t gotten enough money to worry about it. I entered my pin and within 10 minutes they started up again.

    I’d love to tell you about the automation. Send me an email and I’ll tell you. jeffrichley@gmail.com

    [Reply]

    Eric G. Reply:

    That’s interesting, I’ve never heard of that happening, but glad to hear you figured it out. I’ll send you an e-mail shortly.

  13. Eric, I’d been reading lately about nihe sites, but to see a new concept (micro-niche) laid out so thoroughly is VERY helpful and inspiring! I will follow your progress and hope to learn with each installment.

    Thanks,
    Mike
    Mike recently posted… I can see clearly now…

    [Reply]

    Eric G. Reply:

    Thanks for the comment Mike! The next installment should be published soon…

    [Reply]

  14. Impressive information and really thanks to you for providing this information with good explanation way.
    Arjun Rai recently posted… Brownfields

    [Reply]

    Eric G. Reply:

    Thanks Arjun!

    [Reply]

  15. Enjoying following you on this. A note on Google and privacy policy page – Google requires a privacy policy that includes disclosure of third party cookie data. You can find it here.

    Also, I’m curious as to why you prefer to post your articles as pages rather than as posts? I’d appreciate your thoughts.

    Thanks

    [Reply]

    Eric G. Reply:

    Thanks for the comment Bill. Posting articles as pages instead of posts is just a personal preference of mine – One reason I like it is because the article won’t have a date or author stamped on it. I’d prefer that it look like an informational site vs. a blog, but I could definitely see how you’d want it to look like a blog with certain niches. Either way works though!

    [Reply]

  16. Aren’t the searches for the other 2 KW too low?

    [Reply]

    Eric G. Reply:

    For secondary keywords (i.e. not my main keyword), I’m not too concerned with search volume. I tend to choose low volume keywords here because they are less likely to be competitive.

    [Reply]

  17. Should articles be at least 1000 words after panda update? Also pardon me the site looks a bit ugly and MFA, will that affect my rankings?

    [Reply]

    Eric G. Reply:

    1,000 words is a safe amount, but I don’t believe that’s absolutely necessary. No one knows for sure what Google really wants, but I generally assume that anything 700+ words for the main page is sufficient. People have ranked sites with less words, and on the flip side, sites with 1,000+ words aren’t guaranteed to rank well.

    Ugly and MFA-looking sites are okay (in my opinion) as long as you stick to Google’s rules for ad placement AND your content is good. This shouldn’t affect your rankings (given the fact that there are tons of sites like these that rank well), but no one knows what Google will change in the future. Your best bet is to always diversify your themes and site layout.

    [Reply]

  18. I am having trouble adding the 468×15 link ad in the header (below the banner). I am using a similar template to you. Can you please explain how to add that? Thanks a lot. I subscribed to your newsletter.

    [Reply]

    Eric G. Reply:

    Hi Steve,

    To add the link ad, I put the Google AdSense code in the page template (page.php). Instead of copying & pasting the exact code here, I have put it in a text file that you can download and take a look at here:

    http://www.my4hrworkweek.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/01/pagephp.txt

    Hopefully that helps, but let me know if you have any other questions!

    [Reply]

    Steve Reply:

    I am still having problems. I appreciate your help – the ad just doesnt want to show up. Am I placing it wrong? I uploaded my page.php here: http://www.text-upload.com/read.php?id=258685&c=7158985

    If you would take a look at it and let me know what I am doing wrong that would be very nice of you

    [Reply]

    Eric G. Reply:

    Hi Steve,

    I’m very sorry for the delayed response! The link you provided here doesn’t show any text when I go to it, but there is one other thing that could be an issue.

    It could be that there are no text link ads to display, so Google displays nothing – I’ve had this happen on one site before. However, the ads should still sometimes appear, so if you NEVER see them, there could still be a problem.

    What if you try placing the code in the middle of a page/blog post? If it still doesn’t work there, we at least know the issue has nothing to do with the theme, but maybe there is a problem with the ad itself.

  19. Hey Eric, I was wondering how you do on-page SEO? Do you use any plugin to help you?

    I know this is super-important and sometimes my new post is ranked at 10+ without any backlinks (assuming low competition).
    Kent @ Make Extra Money Online recently posted… My 2012 Make Extra Money Online Goals

    [Reply]

    Eric G. Reply:

    Hi Kent,

    I use a plugin called “WordPress SEO” for my on-page SEO. It’s a great plugin with a lot of options and features – some of them are confusing, but most are pretty self-explanatory.

    [Reply]

  20. I have never thought that these things can be done like this. Impressive information. Thanks for sharing this with us.
    Arjun Rai recently posted… Repo RV

    [Reply]

    Eric G. Reply:

    Thanks!

    [Reply]

  21. Hi Eric,
    Thanks for the post! I’m glad that you enjoy the service.
    You may already use it, but we have an automatic export to WordPress/Drupal/Joomla function that can save you a little time. Once you turn it on, all your posts will automatically be sent to your blog as a draft. You can make any final tweaks and publish at your leisure, it just removes the one step of copy-pasting content.
    We also have a WordPress plug-in that lets you order, review and approve articles from the comfort of your WP admin area. :)

    [Reply]

    Eric G. Reply:

    Hi Christina,

    Thanks so much for stopping by to comment! I’ve never used the automatic export or plug-in before, but it definitely seems worth checking out.

    Thanks again!

    [Reply]

  22. Hi Eric

    Great blog! Great and simple idea and great step-by-step instructions laid out here. I do believe you will succeed and much would like to follow your steps. ;)

    However, I have one big question about doing research for your content. do you have to do it yourself and provide authors with what you found or just it is ALWAYS enough to give them a subject, general instructions and wait for the job done. this is what you did here.

    but what if i wanted to have an article written about e.g. lathes (what kinds of lathes there are, what features are to be looked for when buying a lathe, etc.). As far as you are not into it, you must do some or much research and probably there is not much information on it. This could be really difficult for a writer. So, can I have my order rejected or charged more in such case?

    to sum up, this aspect of doing research for your content seems interesting to me. I wonder what you think.

    Greetings

    [Reply]

    Eric G. Reply:

    Hi Pawel,

    For me, it has always been enough to provide the writer with an article title (i.e. your target keyword) and general guidelines for what to write about. Usually the writer will research the topic. If there’s something specific you want the article to focus on, you should certainly make that clear in the instructions. I like to give the writer the freedom to write about anything that fits within my guidelines. If there’s a subject that’s very difficult to research and write about, you will probably find 1 of 3 things happen:

    1) No writers will accept your order, and it might stay as an open order for longer than typical orders.
    2) An average writer will accept your order and deliver an article that you aren’t really satisfied with.
    3) A good writer will accept your order because he or she is good at doing research even for more difficult topics.

    With TextBroker, you can specify the type of quality writer you want (up to “5 stars”). If you place the order requiring a 5 star article (more expensive), you probably have a decent chance of your article being written the way that you want it. Again though, the more detail and information you provide, the more likely you are to get what you want. If you choose to do a lot of the research yourself (and give the author links of where to find the information), you’ll get a better product.

    [Reply]

    Christina Zila Reply:

    Hi Pawel, hi Eric,
    I absolutely agree that the more information you can give the author, the better content they can deliver.
    However, because our database is very broad, you may find a writer that has experience on the topic. You can ask the authors to write an introductory article. When you review it, you’ll have a better idea about the subject, and you can get more specific about it. You can also ask authors just to generate titles on the topic. For example, you could ask for 50 titles on lathes. This would cost around $5. Then you can pick and choose the ones you like, turning them back into full orders. This way, you don’t have to be an expert, but you still look like one!
    Cheers,
    Christina

    [Reply]

    Eric G. Reply:

    Thanks Christina – I had no idea you could also pay authors to generate titles on a topic. That’s great! I do prefer to research my own titles (because I know the keywords I am targeting), but I could definitely see how that might be helpful for others.

  23. Hi Eric, I’ve visited your website using my FireFox. It has the Adbloc Add-on installed and this removed all your ads. I believe that you lose money as many people are not aware of the ads – they are automatically removed.
    Are you aware of this issue?
    Jack

    [Reply]

    Eric G. Reply:

    Thanks for the comment, Jack. Actually, my AdSense account was disabled, which is why you no longer see any ads.

    [Reply]

    andriy Reply:

    Hi Eric. That is not good about your Adsense account. Do you think it is because you were running too many sites on it? I hope you will find a solution.

    [Reply]

    Eric G. Reply:

    Hi Andriy, I don’t think this was the reason. Having many websites in and of itself is not against Google’s rules. They believed my sites posed a risk of “invalid click activity”, or at least that’s the reason they cited.

  24. Impressive information. Thanks for sharing this with us.

    [Reply]

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