AdSense Micro-Niche Site Public Case Study – Where Do We Go From Here? (Part 6)

Although this case study seems complete (the site is currently on page 2 for its targeted keyword, but on page 1 for secondary keywords), it’s actually just the beginning.  The purpose of this case study was not just to create one stand alone project.  After all, what good is one micro-niche AdSense site that will probably never earn more than $50 in a given month?

The exciting part of this case study was not the case study itself – I know it was helpful to a lot of people out there, based on feedback I received, but the excitement is yet to come.  This case study was merely a springboard to much greater things and hopefully positive learning experiences.

In case you haven’t been following along, I’ll start off by linking you to the previous parts of this case study:

With the foundation of the information laid out in each of these sections, there are a few objectives I hope to accomplish…

Replicating Success

When I first started out trying to make money online, I remember someone telling me something to the effect of, “If you can find a way to make $1 a day, all you have to do is do that 100 times and you’ll make $100/day.” Whether or not $100/day is your goal isn’t the point – the point is, if you can be successful with something small, you’d ideally like to be able to scale that same success into something much larger.

I’ve gone through the process of creating one niche site (the site for this case study) which I believe has the potential to earn at least $1 per day.  My goal (this was one listed in my 2012 goals) is to have 250 niche sites created by the end of 2012.  If I can indeed average $1/day for each site, that would net me $250/day, or about $91,000/year.  I think we can all agree that this amount would be great.  Now, I can’t expect every site to be successful, but I still think this is an achievable goal.

Efficiency Through Batching

Creating 250 niche sites is no small task (although I already have 70+ created, so really, I have about 180 left to build).  To be successful, I need to find a way to work more efficiently. Although I outsource content creation, I still do most other things myself.  To me, the key to efficiency with these sites is batching - grouping similar tasks and doing them all at the same time (not necessarily simultaneously, but within a relatively short period of time).

I’ve found that a good number of sites to batch (for me) is 20.  For each of these sites, I will batch everything I can – even something as minor as installing a plugin.  In other words, I will install plugins for all 20 sites before moving onto another step in the process.  Certain steps of the process take longer than others, of course.  For example, I can’t research 20 keywords/domains all in one sitting, and I can’t backlink all 20 sites in one sitting.  I can, however, focus on that one step before I move onto anything else.

I may write a more detailed post about this in the future (going in-depth on what tasks I batch, along with some tips for better batching), but the basic logic behind batching is that by grouping together similar tasks, you gain some efficiency.

Repeating a task causes you to become better and quicker at performing that task.  When I’m doing something for 20 sites, I guarantee you that it takes me longer to perform the task for site #1 than it does for site #20. The amount of efficiency gained will vary by task, but when you combine the time savings from all the different tasks you can batch when creating 20 micro-niche websites, it’s substantial.

Finding a Backlink Strategy that Really Works

When you’re trying to test the effectiveness of an ad or a landing page, the primary thing you need is traffic.  Traffic allows you to split-test different components, like titles, colors, images, and more.  With enough traffic, the results become significant, and they allow you to implement changes that lead to more conversions – i.e. more money in your pocket.  But what about testing other things, like backlinking tools?  It’s impossible to do it with one or even a few sites, because there are too many variables.  Each website and keyword has a unique competitive environment, so one backlinking strategy will affect different sites in different ways.

But what if you could test out different backlinking tools across 20 sites that target similar competition keywords, have similar quantities of content, and in general, have very similar characteristics (aside from niche/target keyword)?  What about doing this across 40 sites or more?  What I hope to do is use my large quantity of niche sites to get meaningful data on which backlinking tools are effective with low-competition niche sites like the ones I am creating.

While I will probably ultimately use multiple tools to rank my sites, I still want to know which tools are more effective, so that if one is significantly more expensive than the other, I can evaluate if it’s worth keeping one or both tools, or maybe get rid of them altogether and try something different.  My first test, as explained in part 5 of the case study, is to evaluate the effectiveness of Unique Article Wizard vs. Article Marketing Robot. Right now, I have 10 recently created sites that only have backlinks from UAW, and 10 similar sites that only have backlinks from AMR.

After a few months, I will see if I can determine which one is more effective, or if they have similar results.  If so, AMR will be the better choice because there’s only a one-time fee to purchase the software (vs. the monthly charge from UAW).  Either way, I will report the results once I feel they are meaningful.

This is only one example of some testing I will be doing – I also plan on testing other backlink tools in the future.  I believe that having a large portfolio of niche sites will allow me to really compare various SEO tools.

More to Come!

While these are a few of my objectives, I’m sure there will be more to come.  The value of creating a large portfolio of sites goes beyond just hoping to earn $1 or more per day from a single site.  For example, of these 250 sites, I’m sure I will look to build up at least a few of them into more “authority-style” sites.  Obviously, this will require a lot more work, but it’s still something I am keeping on my radar for the future.

What do you think of my plans for these micro-niche sites?  Are there other things you can think of that I can do with these sites?  Share your thoughts in the comments!

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31 Responses to “AdSense Micro-Niche Site Public Case Study – Where Do We Go From Here? (Part 6)”

  1. Good work, I recently finished my 1st niche site. My only goal for this site was to reach top 5 in google, and any money that comes in is a bonus. I currently am at number 2 for my primary keywords. It took me awhile to get this up bc I did 100% of the work myself. I wanted to learn a process and replicate just like you, and hopefully look into outsourcing content creation in the future.

    If you have time can you take a quick 10 sec glance at my site and tell me what you think or give a quick tip?? Thanks a lot

    The site is http://howtolightenskinnaturally.com

    [Reply]

    Eric G. Reply:

    Great job getting to #2, hopefully you’re starting to see some income from it.

    The site looks pretty good, but my one tip would be this: move the image (the one that’s at the top of the article) and replace it with an AdSense ad block, left-aligned with the text. You’ll see a lot more ad clicks this way.

    [Reply]

  2. Eric,

    It looks like you have it all planned out. Something that I have been doing for the past couple months is buying 10 domains at a time and working on those for 2 weeks until it is time to buy another 10. This works because 2 weeks is more than enough time for me to outsource the writing and then do all the backlinking with UAW, AMR and BMR.

    One tip I would give you is to create a video for each niche site you do and then send thousands of backlinks to your Youtube account. This will give your niche website a huge jump and the fact that you are building indirect links means that you can create as many as you possibly can. This is something that I have been doing and it has worked out great.
    Adam recently posted… Do You Earn Money Online With Twitter

    [Reply]

    Eric G. Reply:

    Hi Adam,

    Sounds like you have a nice plan in place – batching with 10 sites over a 2 week period seems like a solid way to do it.

    Thanks for the video tip – I wouldn’t have ever thought to do that, but I can definitely see how it would add a stronger backlink to the niche site. I’ll have to try that out soon.

    Thanks!

    [Reply]

  3. Batching is key and does speed up the process I have been building a site on the fly daily in January documenting what it is like in Thailand living on $400 a month. Each day I need to go back thru 18 months of pictures. The first few days I was doing the pics daily , now I grab 3-4 days pics at a time considerably speeding up the process.

    The site is http://www.livinginthailand.net/

    [Reply]

    Eric G. Reply:

    Great idea for a site! I wish I could live on $400 a month (in Chicago) :) .

    [Reply]

    neale Reply:

    It’s not easy here even in the cheapest places, $600 is very comfortable for a single guy with a studio and motor bike. With $1,500 you would have the equivalent of a $75,000 a year lifestyle.
    neale recently posted… Friday Wrap: Manageable Lists

    [Reply]

  4. Thank you Eric for letting us know about your post here and I am really honored to read this…Great job!!
    Jazmin recently posted… Jump Start Your Metabolism

    [Reply]

    Eric G. Reply:

    Thanks for the comment, Jazmin!

    [Reply]

  5. Hi Eric,

    I’ve really enjoyed this series and thank you for the transparency you’ve brought to the process. I’ve learned some things, as well.

    I’ve also enjoyed your site in general and it saddens me to see you employing the pop-up for the Ultimate Backlink Tracker. The problem is, the pop-up is too large for my browser window and I can’t get to the “x” to close it.

    I finally switched to another browser to view the article, which is annoying to have to do. I’m trying to mention this in a constructive way (hard to always make things sound right in written form) so please don’t take offense.

    Anyway, best of luck to you going forward. Have a good tax season.

    Bill

    [Reply]

    Eric G. Reply:

    Thanks Bill – I’m surprised you’re having that issue with the pop-up. Which browser are you using? I’ve tested it in IE, Firefox, and Chrome without issues. The good thing is, as long as you don’t clear your cookies, you’ll only see the pop-up one time.

    I know pop-ups are in general very annoying, but it’s a one time thing (as mentioned above), and it’s actually very effective.

    Either way though, I appreciate the feedback!

    [Reply]

  6. Eric,

    I noticed you changed your ad layout for the block ads from what was set up in step 4 – moved from above the content to left of the content.

    Can you share your reasoning on that? Was it a result of placement testing?

    Thanks,

    Bill (again)

    [Reply]

    Eric G. Reply:

    Hi Bill,

    Great question – I actually didn’t change any placement of the ads. Your view of the ads will be a function of both your browser window size and the resolution of your computer monitor.

    For example, when my browser is maximized, I see both ads above the content (as pictured in the screenshot from part 4 of the case study). However, as I shrink my browser window, there is a point where the ads will move to the left of the content. This is just the way their alignment works.

    I’m sure I could make it so that the ads will stay at the top if I play with it a bit, but I’m fine with the ads shifting to the left when the browser window is smaller (and I believe left alignment is an effective placement vs. right alignment).

    Hope that clears it up for you!

    [Reply]

  7. It never crossed into my mind the idea of replicating my success in one site. It really sounds good but making 250 niche sites is too much for me. That will require me to spend a lot for outsourcing. But then, i might reconsider your idea. Thanks for sharing.
    Farrell recently posted… The Year to Improve Eyesight

    [Reply]

    Eric G. Reply:

    Thanks for the comment, Farrell. 250 sites is definitely a lot – it’s a personal goal of mine, so don’t feel you need to make it your goal too! Figure out what works best for you, and tweak it from there.

    [Reply]

  8. Just a quick question for you.

    You said that you wanted to have 250 sites by the end of 2012, right.

    How much do the domain names, etc. all cost you? Is it a per month that you pay or per year? Just wondering because you’d think with 250 sites, it could get quite expensive to have them online.

    [Reply]

    Eric G. Reply:

    I have all of my sites hosted across two different hosting accounts, and both accounts allow for “unlimited” domains, so my hosting expense remains fixed regardless of how many sites I create.

    As for domains, the cost is annual, and it’s about $10/year per site. Although that would equate to $2,500/year for 250 sites, I would hope (and expect) that the income from 250 sites would definitely exceed $2,500/year.

    So yes, while the expense is great, the income is hopefully greater. :)

    [Reply]

    Alex Reply:

    Thanks for the reply, Eric.

    What are the hosting accounts that you use?

    [Reply]

    Eric G. Reply:

    I have one account with HostGator and one with BlueHost.

  9. Hey Eric,

    Really awesome series of posts. I really like how detailed everything was. I also can’t wait for the results of the AMR vs. UAW experiment because I’m wondering the same thing myself.

    [Reply]

    Eric G. Reply:

    Thanks Tony! I can’t wait for the results either. :P

    [Reply]

  10. Congrats, it looks as if you’re #1 when I searched for the key phrase. How are your earnings P?

    [Reply]

    Eric G. Reply:

    Really? I wish I was seeing that! When I search on Google, I only see the site near the top of page 2. Unfortunately, there isn’t a ton of traffic in that spot, so the earnings are still pretty low. My January income report will be published tomorrow, so you’ll see what the site earned last month (hint: not a lot :P ).

    [Reply]

  11. Eric I hope I don’t sound negative but, with 70 sites already created and only $120+ from Adsense/Amazon aren’t you losing money on this?

    I hope I’ve missed something, I’m just concerned about the venture of opening up 180 more sites. It seems that the domain registration and the web hosting alone would eat any earnings you have right up.

    If they were all earning $1 per day then they would be paying for themselves plus netting you a few dollars per month.

    Can you clarify this for me?

    [Reply]

    Eric G. Reply:

    Ryan,

    That’s an excellent question. Technically, yes, right now I am losing money. The thing with these sites though is that you generally can’t expect them to be profitable within the first few months. Usually by month 2 or 3, my backlinking campaign is still in progress. And sometimes it takes even longer than that for a site to rank well and begin earning. While it’s possible that I could be looking back a year from now and declaring failure, I’m very far from that point right now. I’m still confident that the sites as a whole will be profitable for me (some more than others of course). I’ve actually written a pretty detailed explanation of how well I need these sites to perform to be profitable AND at what point I should give up on any given site:

    http://www.my4hrworkweek.com/how-to-know-when-to-give-up-with-niche-sites/

    Thanks for the comment!

    [Reply]

  12. Hey Eric – good luck with making 250 sites. I agree batch building is great. I do the same thing. I only outsource my article writing. Maybe later ill outsource my niche site creation when I have some more money to play with. Happy to see others have the same plan as I do. Hope you make it in 2012!
    James recently posted… Nichepursuits.com | How To Make A Great Living With Niche Sites

    [Reply]

    Eric G. Reply:

    Thanks James! I’ve actually since decided to slow down my niche site production in favor of making my current 80+ sites stronger. I still plan to get to 250 eventually, but probably not this year. :)

    [Reply]

  13. Hi Eric,

    I have just founded your website, have reviewed the complete 6 steps tutorial, but now I can fin the site movingtogether.net withou any Adsense ads.

    What does it mean? You were banned from Adsense? Was one of the sites to give up? If so you would at least keep Adsense Ads till the domain would expire.

    And one last question, are you trying to combine Adsense, Amazon and Clickbank in the same microniche site? Would be there any problem in doing so?

    I lied, the last one, I promise, would be there any difference in this strategy to do this with spanish language sites?

    Thnks so much for your posts and time, regards!

    [Reply]

    Eric G. Reply:

    Hi Carlos- Yes, unfortunately I was banned from AdSense. I wrote all about it here: http://www.my4hrworkweek.com/adsense-account-disabled/

    There shouldn’t be a problem with combining multiple forms of monetization on one site, such as using AdSense, Amazon, and Clickbank. They won’t necessarily all work on all sites, so it’s important to test different things to see which ones give you the best overall earnings.

    There is no difference using this strategy for Spanish language sites, but you do have to check the traffic of various Spanish keywords, as they will be different than English ones. Likewise, the Google search engine for Mexico (or whatever Spanish-speaking country may be searching) will likely display different results than the regular http://www.Google.com (US version).

    [Reply]

  14. Hi Eric,
    interesting case study that you posted here. Just read all 6 parts and wantedto check out the site (movingintogether.net) to find it is not active anymore (just a domain parking page).
    Why did you give up the site although you had good rankings?

    T.

    [Reply]

    Eric G. Reply:

    Hi Tom, the main reason I stopped the site was because my AdSense account was cancelled. I couldn’t find any other really worthwhile way to monetize it, so I gave up. Here’s the post where I explain about my AdSense account:

    http://www.my4hrworkweek.com/adsense-account-disabled/

    [Reply]

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