How to Build a Niche Site in 0 Hours

If you’re currently in the niche site “game,” you know that creating one or two sites probably won’t be enough for you to reach your financial goals, when it comes to your online passive income.  Throughout your journey, you hope to hit that “home run” site that earns you thousands each month – it’s certainly possible to do, and many have done it.

When we’re building niche sites of the micro variety, however, quantity is an important factor. If you can build a site that earns $50/month fairly easily, basic math will tell you that 100 of those sites will earn you $5,000/month.  Getting from your first site to your 100th site is no small task, and it’s very likely that you’ll need some help along the way.

With that in mind, I thought it would be interesting to explore what it takes to outsource nearly every aspect of niche site creation.  Although you may not outsource everything (and I’ll explain why I don’t), I think this guide will give you more than enough information to help you take that step toward freeing up more of your time so you can focus on what you’re good at and what you enjoy doing.

Let’s Break Down the Steps

As we get into the process of outsourcing, I want to begin by breaking down the steps for creating your typical niche site.  I’m going to write this with my Amazon niche site challenge in mind, however I’ll try to be broad enough to list the steps that apply to most niche websites.  For most of the steps below, I will comment with some further detail about how I approach that step.

  • 1) Niche Research

    • Core Actions

      • Find your topic of interest
      • Identify your target keywords
    • Suggested Resources
    • Comments: This is where most projects will begin, and ironically, this is one step I don’t like to outsource.  The main reason is, I actually enjoy this step and I feel like this is where I can add real value to my niche site.  To me, freeing up my time means having more time for niche research.  Also, I really enjoy using Market Samurai, which I feel allows me to perform niche research very efficiently (almost as if I’m outsourcing the task to the software).
  • 2) Purchase Domain
    • Core Actions

      • Purchase a domain (obviously…)
    • Suggested Resources
    • Comments: Because this step is quick and involves you spending money, it’s probably not worth outsourcing it.  If you have a virtual assistant (“VA”) who you trust with making purchases on your behalf, you can send him or her an e-mail with the domain to purchase and configure.  If you’re going to be purchasing lots of domains, it may be worth showing a VA how to purchase and configure a domain, so that the VA can do this for you in the future.
  • 3) Basic Site Configuration
    • Core Actions
      • Install WordPress (recommended niche site platform) or other content management system
      • Install WordPress theme
      • Install WordPress plugins
      • Configure WordPress settings
    • Suggested Resources
    • Comments: These are all tasks that can be easily completed by VAs.  Here’s one tip that I utilize, and it’s extremely helpful: Instead of trying to put together instructions to show VAs how to do certain tasks, always keep in mind that someone has probably already done it for you.  The reason I linked to two video tutorials above is to show you that you can find how-to videos for nearly any online task, especially related to setting up a site with WordPress.  Once your VA has access to your hosting account (if you choose to give access), you can send them various tutorial videos to show them how to do what you want them to do.  I typically like to install WordPress myself and then simply give the VA access to the WordPress site’s login and password, so that they don’t ever need to access my hosting account.
  • 4) Logo Design (optional)
    • Core Actions
      • Design a logo for the header of your site
    • Suggested Resources
      • None, if you are outsourcing this task.
    • Comments: I prefer to always create a custom header/logo for my niche sites, because I believe it goes a long way toward establishing credibility for your site.  The plain text heading isn’t attractive, and screams “amateur,” in my opinion.  I’ve gotten really good at putting together quick header logos using Adobe Photoshop, however you can easily find a VA who will usually do this inexpensively.  Alternatively, you can use a site like 48 Hours Logo.
  • 5) Content Creation
    • Core Actions
      • Write content (e.g. articles) to give niche site depth and give context to affiliate links (# of articles will vary)
      • Write articles for backlinking purposes
    • Suggested Resources
      • Sources of information for content will vary by niche/topic
    • Comments: I’ve found this to be one of the easiest areas to outsource, once you know what you want.  There are literally thousands of freelance writers online, all very happy to take on your article-writing projects, regardless of topic.  How you approach your instructions to a freelance writer is up to you.  I like to provide them with exact article titles so that they know exactly what to write about.  For example, I might want an article for my gardening site (I don’t actually have one) titled “how to effectively grow tomatoes.”  I might define a list of 5-10 article titles like this.  On the other hand, you could simply ask for “5-10 articles about various gardening topics” and leave it up to the judgment of the writer.  I would start with giving exact titles, and then moving to more general instructions once you’re comfortable with it.
  • 6) Search Engine Optimization
    • Core Actions
      • Configure on-site factors (title, keyword density, etc.)
      • Build backlinks
    • Suggested Resources
    • Comments: This is perhaps the most important step in the process, because it’s what’s ultimately going to drive traffic to your niche site.  If you are outsourcing effectively, you don’t need to pay for any software or membership – you just need to be able to effectively define the types of backlinks you want, to your VA.  When it comes to spinning an article, I’ve typically had a VA write the original article, and then I’ve done the spinning myself with The Best Spinner (which is an awesome piece of software).

Hire One VA or Use Several?

Everyone works differently, but in my opinion, hiring multiple virtual workers is the way to go.  I understand if you pay a full-time VA, it might make sense to have him or her do everything, which will work too.  From what I can see, however, there are two key benefits to using multiple VAs: Specialization and diversification.

Specialization

It goes without saying that, in most cases, the more you do something, the better you will become at it.  The idea of specialization has probably been around for thousands of years.  If you remember back to your history classes and learning about the Industrial Revolution, you probably remember the concept of “division of labor.”  Dividing tasks and having individual people or processes responsible for them leads to a more productive output (and in the case of the Industrial Revolution, the growth of an economy).

If we tie this back to niche site creation and working with VAs, the same concept applies.  One VA may be excellent at writing articles, but doesn’t know much about blog commenting or social bookmarking.  You probably don’t want the “jack of all trades” VA, because he may not be able to do each individual task optimally.  If you have each VA focusing on one type of task, he or she should theoretically become better and more efficient at completing that one task.

Diversification

Using multiple VAs goes beyond the simple idea of specialization.  What if your VA gets sick, or disappears and you can no longer contact him?  Using one VA for everything is like investing your entire retirement fund in one company’s stock – it’s risky.  The same diversification principles that apply to investing apply to outsourcing your projects.  If you have two VAs writing articles, one VA commenting on blogs, and one VA building your social networking profiles, the loss of a single VA isn’t going to derail your entire project.

In my opinion, successful outsourcing isn’t about finding the right person – it’s about putting together the right team.

Building Your Team

It’s easy for me to say that you should have a diversified team of VAs who specialize in various tasks, but how do you go about building this team?  It may seem a bit overwhelming, but it doesn’t have to be.  Here’s a list of simple steps you should follow to build your outsourced team:

  1. Identify your projects – This doesn’t apply if you only have one project, but one of the benefits of having a team of VAs comprised of individuals who specialize in certain tasks is that they can work on tasks across multiple projects.  For example, if you have a VA who is configuring WordPress sites, he or she can do more than one at a time.
  2. Identify the critical tasks in each project - The steps I gave you above (at the beginning of this article) are a good framework for what you should map out, but your niche site project may not require the same exact steps.  Be as detailed as possible – this will make it easier to outsource each task.
  3. Group similar tasks within and across projects – Certain tasks go well together – for example, installing WordPress plugins and configuring the site’s WordPress theme go well together, and there’s a good chance that a VA who is familiar with WordPress will be able to do both tasks efficiently.
  4. Identify your role on the team – Although you’re the person organizing everything, there may be some tasks you don’t feel comfortable outsourcing (and will therefore do yourself).  Make sure to take this into account as you identify and group tasks for outsourcing.
  5. Create project descriptions and request project bids – Take your grouped tasks from step 3 and convert them into project descriptions (I’ll give some examples below).  Post these project descriptions on your preferred outsourcing platform – I’ll explain some different options below.
  6. Compile any necessary instructions to complete the tasks – In some cases, you won’t need to give detailed instructions.  If you’re hiring a VA to submit articles to directories for backlinks, they may only need to know the URL of the site and the anchor text you want to use.  If you’re having a VA install WordPress or WordPress plugins and they have little experience in doing so, you may need to provide them with instructional videos (which can be found with a simple Google search, as I previously showed above).  Typically, you want to hire people who already have the necessary background to complete the task.

Where to Outsource

One of the great things about outsourcing is that you have a lot of options.  Everyone seems to have their preferences, and I’m no exception.

My Current Favorites

  • ElanceThis is what I use most frequently.  It’s very simple to post a project and receive bids (and you’re under no obligation to actually execute the project if you don’t see any bids that you like).  The minimum project size is $50, so if you have smaller projects, it’s best to find a way to group them (as I previously discussed) so that you’re getting at least $50 worth of work.  One thing I really like about Elance is that you can read feedback and see ratings for each freelancer, so you have an idea of the quality to expect before hiring someone.
  • Fiverr - At first glance, the types of jobs posted on Fiverr seem like gimmicks.  If you’re not familiar with Fiverr, it’s a site where people post jobs they’re willing to do for $5.  A lot of it isn’t worth $5, but some things are.  I’ve experimented with Fiverr more recently, getting things like 2 unique articles written for $5 (i.e. $2.50 per article) and having backlinks built on forum profiles of high PR sites.  In both cases, the jobs were completed successfully, though the articles required a little bit of editing.

Other Outsourcing Sites

  • oDeskI don’t currently use this site, but I know many people who do and really like it.  It seems to me that it’s similar to Elance.  Definitely worth trying if you want to search from a larger pool of VAs.
  • MicroworkersI’ve used Microworkers before, but not for anything extensive.  This site is best if you want to pay a small price for individual backlinks, or hire “microworkers” to help you with social media tasks (like gaining Twitter followers or Facebook likes).
  • Virtual Zeta - If you’re taking on a larger project or want to take a more professional approach, you can pay someone to find you the perfect VA.  This is what Virtual Zeta does.  I haven’t used it, but it was started by Maren Kate (from Escapingthe9to5.com) who I trust and respect.
  • Virtual Staff FinderSimilar to Virtual Zeta, Virtual Staff Finder helps you find your ideal VA through an extensive process, which includes a consultation with the site’s founder, Chris Ducker.  I haven’t used this service (yet), but Chris is someone who I’ve come to really respect and trust, so I’m confident that this service would solve your needs if you choose to take this route.
  • CraigslistYou’re probably familiar with this site, but may have never thought about using it for outsourcing.  I think Craigslist works well for jobs where you can easily evaluate the results – like article writing or logo design.

Figuring Out How Much Money To Spend

This is one issue that probably has no right answer.  The old saying applies: “You get what you pay for.“  With a site like Fiverr, you don’t really have a decision to make with price.  With other sites, like Elance, it’s difficult to calculate.  Here are a few of my tips:

  1. Let the market compete for your project – One way to be fairly certain you’re getting a fair price for your work is to allow bidders of a project to see everyone’s bids.  This is possible when you post a job on Elance, and probably with other similar sites.
  2. Evaluate your niche site’s earning potential – This really helps to give you some perspective on the value of outsourcing.  If you expect your site to make $50 per month and you’re only spending $200 on outsourced tasks, you can expect to make back your expenses in about 4 months once the site is up and running.  Playing with these estimated figures may help give you the peace of mind needed to go through with your outsourcing project(s).
  3. Expect what you pay for – I already mentioned this, but it’s worth mentioning again.  When I spend $3 on an article, it usually requires a bit of editing.  When I spend $5, it’s sometimes higher quality.  It’s tempting to get work done extremely cheap, but keep in mind that it may eventually lead to you doing more work in order to bring the quality up to your desired level.
  4. Stop waiting and start experimenting – Before I tried outsourcing anything, I was in the mindset of “I can do this myself – it won’t take too long and I’m good at it, so there’s no need to pay someone else.”  Even though I knew outsourcing would free up some of my time so that I could focus on tasks I was better at, I hesitated to take action.  Once I actually set up a project on Elance and saw the bids come in from experienced freelancers, I realized how simple it was.

Some Examples of My Outsourced Projects

Pen & Paper

I thought it might be helpful to show you examples of actual projects I’ve posted before.  I’ve hidden some of the details, for obvious reasons.

These are simply examples of some of my project descriptions – they often vary, as I am always experimenting with new ways to get higher quality work at reasonable prices.  I’d encourage you to write your own project descriptions based on exactly what you require, rather than copying someone else’s word for word. :)

Ironically, Outsourcing Can Be a Lot of Work

The idea of outsourcing everything while you sit back on a beach, sipping a margarita as your bank account inflates like a balloon, sounds awesome.  The great thing is, that dream isn’t implausible.  People have achieved it.  Unfortunately, it’s going to take a lot of hard work to get there.

Although you’re paying someone else to do work for you, it doesn’t mean you’re off the hook completely.  When it comes to article writing, you may find yourself proofreading the articles and discovering that the quality isn’t exactly up to your standards.  You’re forced to make a decision: do I send it back for revision, or correct it as I proofread it?  Which would take less time?  Often, you’ll determine that making changes yourself is the quickest solution.  This will take up some of your time, perhaps unexpectedly.

Even when your VAs are doing their jobs smoothly, you still need to spend time talking to them – giving them further instruction, following up on project status, and giving feedback.  There’s a managing part of the process that can’t be outsourced – at least, not yet (you could technically hire someone to manage your VAs, but that still requires some work and adds an additional layer of expenses).

Maybe you won’t be able to build an entire niche site in 0 hours (I’m sorry if I tricked you!), but you can certainly take large chunks of your site development and spend minimal time on it.

Although I believe this niche site outsourcing guide is a good start, I’d love for this to become a collaborative product.  In other words, please leave your outsourcing tips (or a criticism of my tips) in the comments!

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61 Responses to “How to Build a Niche Site in 0 Hours”

  1. I am following some of your aspects. I need to know how you manage you wordpress blog. It always have hackers problem.

    [Reply]

    Eric G. Reply:

    What kind of hacker problems are you having? In my experience, WordPress is a relatively secure platform (although spam comments are always an issue). I’d be happy to help if you have more specific questions! :)

    [Reply]

    Rahul Reply:

    Hi, Eric
    Wordpress is easily hackable. And plugin will be outdated after some time. I mean if i have 100s of websites in future. How you will manage them and simple solution like Xsite pro or Xfactor2. I don’t have both of them but like to know? Also, how do you backlink you blogs manually or you hire some one?

    [Reply]

    Eric G. Reply:

    Hi Rahul – I’m not too concerned with plugins becoming outdated. As long as my sites are set up and functioning, there’s really no need to update plugins later on. Generally, none of the plugins is crucial to the operation of the site.

    I’m also not too concerned with hacking, as there isn’t a lot a hacker can do besides change my affiliate codes to his own, but I suspect the average hacker has bigger fish to fry. I can’t think of a safer alternative to WordPress that’s just as good in every other aspect, so I’m willing to take whatever risk there is with WordPress.

    I’m not familiar with Xsite pro or Xfactor2 – what are they?

    As for backlinking, I do some backlinking manually, and outsource some. Sometimes it’s a mix – for example, I’ll have a VA write an article, but then I’ll spin that article myself and use it for backlinking on various article websites.

  2. Eric,
    I like the ideas you covered here. I finally gave in and tried my first job on eLance (logo design) and was pretty pleased with the final result (not to mention a bit overwhelmed with the initial amount of proposals). Have you had any experience with full time VAs? They are a bit out of my budget at this point but I’m hoping to eventually get there.

    The one main thing I was looking to outsource recently was article writing so it’s interesting you mentioned it. Have you used instead any articles (with proper attribution, of course) from sites like eZineArticles? I’m sure you know this but I found out yesterday that you can steal the articles word for word to post on your own site provided you leave the author box and backlink intact.

    Brett

    [Reply]

    Eric G. Reply:

    Hey Brett,

    I don’t personally have experience with full-time VAs – I don’t feel I’m at the point where I would need one or one would be worthwhile. Up to this point, I’ve just outsourced things on a project-by-project basis (although I’ve used one VA multiple times before).

    I’ve also never tried using articles from eZine Articles or anywhere else. Honestly, I like having unique content on my site. I believe the terms of using someone’s article from eZine Articles requires that you don’t alter the article in any way. I like to add a lot of contextual links to the articles on my Amazon sites, so I’m not sure if I’d be able to use an article without altering it in some way. I’d prefer to work with content that I completely own. :)

    Thanks for the comment!

    [Reply]

  3. Eric,

    Impressive article with some fantastic resources. I’m blown away by the amount of imformation and tips you’ve managed to pack into a single post.

    Time to follow suit and create 2 or 3 more niche sites. You mention Quantity as an important factor in reference to the number of niche sites one should have. Do you recommend a particular numbers of articles to focus on per site? Or is this a continuous process that one should constantly build upon? I would think it could get difficult adding an article every few days for your recommended 100 sites.

    Thanks,
    Ryan
    Ryan recently posted… Bartender Job Description

    [Reply]

    Eric G. Reply:

    Thanks for the comment, Ryan. Glad you enjoyed the article.

    For my “micro-niche” sites, like the ones I use for Amazon products, I aim to publish 5-10 articles, depending on the product(s). Once I have “enough” content up, I generally stop adding articles.

    If I notice a particular site is getting a lot more traffic or interaction than I originally expected, I may go back and add more content if I think it could make the site more valuable to me. Having more articles helps you rank for more long-tail keywords, which brings more traffic and earning opportunities to your site.

    I agree that if you get to the point of having 100 sites, it would be nearly impossible to continue adding content – but maybe by that point, you’d be able to afford a full-time VA who handles all the content addition. :)

    [Reply]

  4. Incredible post. I think anyone looking to make money online whether they’re building niche sites or not, there’s so much useful information here. The amount of detail you include and the logical pathway the post takes makes it extremely easy to digest.
    Andrew Walton recently posted… Happy Holidays from Renegade Writer! Get a Free Copy of “Crush It”

    [Reply]

    Eric G. Reply:

    Thanks Andrew, I really appreciate it. :)

    [Reply]

  5. WOW Eric. Very detailed! I’m guessing this is your pillar post for Pat’s challenge? ;) Even if it isn’t, AWESOME post!

    I’ve been looking into hiring my own virtual assistants to help me out with niche sites I’ve been working on (been falling a bit behind lately). There’s no question that this post will help me out a GREAT deal.

    I’ll probably outsource a few blog posts here and there as well as plugin installs later on as I create more niche sites.

    But I must admit, Eric – Impressive resource of information on outsourcing.

    Thanks for getting so detailed, and I hope you had a wonderful holiday.

    Christina
    Christina Crowe recently posted… Stuck on Your Next Blog Post Idea Change it Up with 14 Blog Post Formats

    [Reply]

    Eric G. Reply:

    Thanks Christina. Yup, this is my pillar post for Pat’s challenge – can’t wait to read yours and everyone else’s. :)

    [Reply]

  6. I’m just getting started with my first niche site, and I’m definitely in Google’s sandbox. Went from ranking 81 to off the charts for over two weeks.

    The bright side is I must be doing something right because I’m #1 in Yahoo and Bing for my keyword!

    Lot’s of great info here. I’ve had the most success outsourcing graphic design. I had a killer logo, website, and custom packaging designed from elance for $600 bucks. The website is www(dot)profilecigs(dot)com (trying not to plug but I thought the results might be useful to others).

    The downside to outsourcing is it takes f-o-r-e-v-e-r. You basically get one change per night made with the time zone difference.

    [Reply]

    Eric G. Reply:

    The sandbox is no fun, but the good thing is, you’ll be out eventually. Just need to be patient. :)

    Over an entire project, using one VA (or one service), I can see how it can take awhile (I’m assuming you had one Elance project for the items you described – correct me if I’m wrong though). I must say though, they did a great job! That site is looking good.

    Thanks for the comment, Mike.

    [Reply]

    Mike Moyer Reply:

    Yea your’re right. They started with the logo, then the packaging, then the website.

    As far as the sandbox goes, I’ve decided to look on the bright side and write a post about all of it’s benefits. :)
    Mike Moyer recently posted… 8 Things I Learned About Life Living On A Tour Bus

    [Reply]

    Eric G. Reply:

    I like the post you wrote – similar to something I was going to write, but now I don’t think I will since you said it well. :)

    You should add a retweet button to your blog posts – that’s definitely a post I would’ve retweeted (unless you have it somewhere and I just missed it).

    Mike Moyer Reply:

    Thanks for the tip.

    I just added it.

    Quick question- How do you ad the rss “recently posted” checkbox to your comments?
    Mike Moyer recently posted… 8 Things I Learned About Life Living On A Tour Bus

    Eric G. Reply:

    You can do it with a plugin called “CommentLuv.”

  7. Really great article. I completely held out from outsourcing anything for a long time (I’m a freelance writer – I think we’re most resistant to outsourcing anything because of the “I can do that!” mentality) but it’s amazing how much of a difference even basic outsourcing can make. If I can outsource 200 articles a month, it not only frees up a ton of extra time for me to set up sites, but that’s 200 articles of work I don’t have to do to get everything running. Since I started outsourcing, the business has grown by leaps and bounds beyond what I could have done on my own. You did a great job of packing in the information in this article, glad to see it!
    Master Dayton recently posted… Freelance Passive Writing Income- And a Vacation Update

    [Reply]

    Eric G. Reply:

    Thanks for the comment, Master Dayton. It sounds like you’re really crushing it with outsourcing, which is cool to hear about. Hopefully others will follow and realize that outsourcing certain tasks can make a huge impact on your business.

    [Reply]

  8. I’ve been using fiverr and freelancer to do some of my projects and i’ve gotten a pretty good end result. As long as you make sure to read up on who you are trying to take on and if they have the skills, usually you will get a good end result.

    As for building a niche site in 0 hours, i think it will take a lot longer than that simply in waiting. Waiting for the outsources to finish of their project.

    [Reply]

    Eric G. Reply:

    Hey Peter, that’s been my experience with Fiverr too. You get what you pay for, but often it’s something worth more than $5.

    And you’re right, waiting is a huge part of it, but that’s why I like having multiple projects going at once. :)

    [Reply]

    Ryan Reply:

    Agree with both of you on the Fiverr experience. Unfortunately the end result does sound like someone was paid $5 for writing content.

    I’ve been using oDesk for a few of my projects and found out that the difference between hiring someone with a lot of experience vs. someone who has no listed history is worth paying a few extra dollars. The number of questions was much much higher for the newbie, which adds a day or two per question. While the experienced contractor was almost turnkey.

    Does anyone have experience using elance vs oDesk? I have only tried the latter.

    [Reply]

    Eric G. Reply:

    I agree with the spending a little bit more money to get a better work product. Sometimes cheap labor is a gamble – for certain things, it’s worth the gamble, but for others, you’d just rather have it done well the first time (and pay a little bit more for it).

    I’ve only tried Elance (not oDesk) and have had mostly positive experiences. My guess is that they probably contain very similarly skilled workers (i.e. there’s a wide range of skill levels) and I would even think that there are many freelancers who offer their services on both sites.

  9. I came here from Pat Flynn’s blog, a blogger I admire so much. Now your content too has convinced me that there are powerful bloggers out there to learn from.

    I have bookmarked your website.

    Thank you
    Ed (of Make Passive Income Online)

    [Reply]

    Eric G. Reply:

    Thanks for stopping by, Ed, I appreciate it. :)

    [Reply]

  10. Hi Eric, very informative document and sits well with stuff I’m looking to do this year. I had a full time VA who I’ve just let go as I didn’t feel I was getting value for money.

    Primarily down to the fact that I could never decide what niches to enter, so more inaction on my part and I actually wanted some design skills as that’s what I was missing most at the time.

    Nevertheless, I’m still sold on the idea.

    Best wishes, Matthew
    Matthew Needham recently posted… Wednesday Wisdom – 6 Tips to improve your business

    [Reply]

    Eric G. Reply:

    Hey Matthew – I understand feeling like you aren’t getting full value for what you spend on a VA. I haven’t hired a full-time VA yet for this very reason.

    It seems like you need to have a clear plan for how you’re going to get your money’s worth from the VA, before you actually hire one. Once that’s in place though, I think they can be extremely valuable.

    Thanks for the comment!

    [Reply]

  11. I’ve done a little bit of outsourcing – mainly for getting headers put together, for getting high volumes of low value links (like forum comments), as well as a few articles on Fiverr.

    I wish I could afford to outsource all of my article writing and backlink building with Unique Article Wizard, but it’s just not in the budget yet. I make about $500 a month from niche sites, and I have other ways in which I’m reinvesting that money.

    I would definitely like to transition to a full time VA when funding permits.

    Quick question for you Eric: Do you focus mainly on quantities of micro-niche sites with like 5,000 searches per month or less, or somewhat larger sites with 10,000k spm or more?

    The very long tail sites wouldn’t be too bad to build 100 of them, but the higher volume sites can take quite a bit of time. I’ve recently transitioned from the micro-niche sites to finally working toward ranking for a keyword with 30,000 searches per month (currently #25 and climbing!)

    Of course, if you did have 100 sites with this kind of volume, think of the revenue!
    Trever Clark recently posted… The Top 10 Greatest Adventure Blogs on the Web

    [Reply]

    Eric G. Reply:

    Hey Trever, great question. I have a couple sites that focus on high search volume keywords (my P90X site for example targets a keyword that receives 90,000 exact searches per month), but the majority right now target lower search volumes. I would say most of my sites target keywords that receive 3,000-10,000 exact searches per month.

    I’m thinking the same as you – make a bunch of these sites and hopefully the money will come rolling in. :)

    [Reply]

  12. So, the income from all this sites and hard work, where dose it come from? Google Adsense? Or something else?
    Roshan Kharia recently posted… While this camera was a bit pricey to me- especially in this economy- I was very pleased

    [Reply]

    Eric G. Reply:

    Part of it can come from Adsense, but it really depends on how you set up your site and what niche you’re in. Adsense works well for certain types of sites, but other sites may be best monetized with Amazon, Clickbank, or other types of affiliate programs.

    [Reply]

  13. The first part I have done but the VA and building teams are a bit overwhelming. Perhaps I need to explore this for myself when the situation arises.

    Oh boy, there’s a lot I need to learn. :-)

    [Reply]

    Eric G. Reply:

    It’s definitely a lot to figure out. :) I’m always learning and I still feel like I’ve barely scratched the surface when it comes to using VAs effectively.

    [Reply]

  14. wow amazing article that you,ve made im erye from indonesia this article help me to open my eyes about build a niche,, but im still having a problem with my MNF software,it need a stable internet connection but in my country the internet connection was so exspensive..

    [Reply]

    Eric G. Reply:

    Thanks for commenting, eyre – hopefully you’ll still be able to be productive despite the unstable internet connection. Best of luck to you!

    [Reply]

  15. Rasmus - My 4 Hours Reply January 28, 2011 at 11:21 am

    Hi Eric

    What a great article. I just wanted to comment on the logo creation. I actually got 4 different logos done on a single job on fiverr. The guy even did them in vector graphic.

    I mean 4 logos for five bucks?! That’s frigging awesome :)
    Rasmus – My 4 Hours recently posted… Confessions of a Lifestyle Designer

    [Reply]

    Eric G. Reply:

    Thanks Rasmus. Yeah, Fiverr can be surprising – sometimes you get crap for $5, but sometimes you’ll get amazing results, worth well over $5. To me, it’s worth the risk (for some things).

    [Reply]

  16. Hi Eric,

    Seriously, I can’t believe how excellent this article is… a lot of valuable information and a lot of great links. I joined Fiverr (thank you Eric) and I’m thinking of joining some other websites too. I held my breath while reading the steps for building a niche website, very interesting, a new thing for me. I never used those steps, I did it my way (like Frank Sinatra) hehe, and worked real hard to get some results. I wonder how good will be the results if following your steps and working as usually.. I’m going to find out, thank you very much for sharing this excellent article! One of the best articles I ever read, it’s bookmarked now.

    Best regards,

    Maria
    Maria Pavel recently posted… CNA Training Program – Finding The Right One

    [Reply]

    Eric G. Reply:

    Thanks for the kind words, Maria!

    [Reply]

  17. Great Write up you got here! I found your blog from pat flynn’s blog, and the back linking strategy that works!

    Cheers!
    shakd recently posted… Google Keyword Tool – The BEST FREE TOOL

    [Reply]

    Eric G. Reply:

    Thanks, I appreciate it! :)

    [Reply]

  18. Indeed a read but what I must say is that you have come up a fantastic article. This one is indeed a masterpiece, the way you have explained everything in such simple manner that anyone can pick up on it.
    Adam Gardner recently posted… Tips to Arrange your Furniture

    [Reply]

  19. It takes more than an hour just to read and understand everything you wrote here :) )

    But yeah, i can see how once you have enough experience and the appropriate knowledge, you can build a niche site in no time.
    Antonia recently posted… The Worst Mistakes You Can Make While Building a Connection

    [Reply]

  20. Could have used this a while ago when i nearly killed myself trying to build one and it only took me about a week to do it. I still wasn’t satisfied with the result.
    Nice plan for beginners!
    Martin recently posted… CDL Classes – How to Become a Professional Truck Driver

    [Reply]

    Eric G. Reply:

    Thanks Martin!

    [Reply]

  21. Only takes me around… three days to build a niche site right now, so i figured i must be doing something wrong since you build it in 0 hours :) )
    I’ll have to take a look into this “outsource” thing.
    Amit recently posted… Forklift Practice Test

    [Reply]

  22. Hi Eric,
    I compare affiliate marketing to rocket science and you just explained it all in a couple of thousand words. Simply mind-blowing and this ‘tutorial’ kind of inspired me to once again try my luck with affiliate marketing.
    Maria Pavel recently posted… CNA Training in Maine

    [Reply]

  23. Hello Eric,
    First, this post is awesome and contains very valuable information useful in every way. I do have a little gripe though, the title says how to build a niche site in 0 hours so I was hoping for a little more information on actually creating one of your sites. Would you have a link that you may have shared to show just one of your sites that you created for Amazon? Would love to get a feel for an actual site that is making money.
    Thank you.
    Kim

    [Reply]

  24. Do not mean to cut in on a conversation, however, just had to tell Mike how awesome the graphics are on his site!
    I hope it is doing well for you.
    Kim

    [Reply]

  25. Are there any way of getting high PR backlinks? I’m at a lost on this one and seems like there are not sites that dofollow. Maybe I just don’t know what I’m doing. IDK

    [Reply]

  26. This is great stuff and i’ll be using some outsourcing when I start building my own Niche Sites. Thanks!
    MyIncomeProject recently posted… 5 Simple Steps To Help Plan Your Next Blog Post

    [Reply]

    Eric G. Reply:

    Thanks for the comment! :)

    [Reply]

  27. Hi Eric –

    This is a great post. Thanks for sharing all this information. My next step is to link build and get VA. Hopefully it works out well. Btw found your post on SPI. Good work with the links.
    James recently posted… Nichepursuits.com | How To Make A Great Living With Niche Sites

    [Reply]

    Eric G. Reply:

    Thanks for the comment James, and glad to have you here as a reader! Best of luck to you in using a VA.

    [Reply]

  28. Its amazing how many people are out there willing to do all your work. I have found some people on Fiverr and have been great. I have also used Scriptlance before.
    Shalu Sharma recently posted… How to make money on Fiverr

    [Reply]

  29. Eric,

    May I ask why Google would ever want to drive traffic to a niche site over an authority site?

    Thanks,

    Sam
    Financial Samurai recently posted… How To Save Money On Cruise Vacations: Lobster Dinners At Filet-O-Fish Prices

    [Reply]

  30. Man, this is gonna take more than 0 hours!
    Financial Samurai recently posted… Does Income Inequality Matter So Long There Is Social Equality?

    [Reply]

  31. Process looks simple but finding a topic that makes money is really a challenging task.

    Beside creating the content for the niche website.
    Satyenhacks recently posted… Basic Search Engine Optimization ( SEO)- Tutorials, Techniques and Tools

    [Reply]

  32. From here, I have completely learned how to start a blog with the best niche. So, I must thank the author for this blog post.
    Abrar Mohi Shafee recently posted… Downgrade WordPress New Version Manually to Old WordPress Version

    [Reply]

  33. Ive been using few times fivver with satisfaction, but had also some disapointment, never do any deals out of fivver after you see a gig! thats my advice

    never thought about craiglist to outsource.

    Actually im looking for someone to make the niche site design, and i do seo.

    [Reply]

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